Basic Zoom Controls in a Virtual Proceeding


Welcome.

Tribunals Ontario uses Zoom as its platform for video proceedings.

In this video, we will show you 4 key zoom controls that you may use when you attend a virtual proceeding at Tribunals Ontario by video. These four controls are the microphone, video camera, rename , and raise hand features.

In this video, we are using the Zoom app. If you are using a web browser, it may look a bit different.

First, let's look at the Microphone feature.

The microphone icon is located at the bottom left-hand corner of the screen. Click the button to mute and unmute. Or press and hold the spacebar on your keyboard to temporarily unmute.

If there is a red line through the microphone, this means that you are on mute. The other people in the proceeding will not be able to hear you.

For clearer sound quality, we recommend that you keep the microphone on mute unless you are speaking. It is a good idea to use headphones with a built-in microphone. Try to avoid background noise like shuffling paper and typing.

If you are not on mute, the adjudicator or other tribunal staff, may mute you to limit unnecessary noise and disruptions during the proceeding.

If you see a button that says ‘join audio’ instead of the microphone button, click the join audio button and select ‘Join with Computer Audio’.

Next, we will show you the Video Camera feature.

The video icon is located at the bottom left corner of your screen. Click the button to start and stop your video.

Clicking ‘start video’ means the other people attending the proceeding can see you.

Stop the video by pressing ‘Stop Video’. A red line indicates that the video is off.

You may be asked to be on camera for part of the proceeding, or the entire time. It will depend on your proceeding.

If your video is on, please make sure your face is clearly visible. It is helpful to position your camera at eye level, relatively close to you, and in good lighting.

You may be asked by the adjudicator or another tribunal staff member to start or stop your video.

Now, let's explore how to Rename.

Each participant’s display name will be in the bottom left corner of their video panel. You can include your pronouns.

In most proceedings, your display name should be your legal name. Or the name that is used on your tribunal documents.

The adjudicator or other tribunal staff may give you other information on how you should name yourself in Zoom. Or they may rename you. For example, the Tribunal staff may ask you to display your role, together with your name, such as Jane Doe, applicant or John Deer, respondent.

If you would like to change your display name, you can rename yourself.

In some proceedings, this rename function may not be available for security or other reasons.

To change your display name, go to the top right of your video panel. click the three dots. Select ‘Rename’. Or hold your mouse over the video panel, and right click. Select ‘Rename’.

Enter a new name and click "Change" to save it for that meeting.

You can also click on the participants button at the bottom of your screen. Find your name in the list. Click the three dots. Select Rename. Enter your name and click ‘change’.

Click on the participant button again to close the participant pane.

You will now see the new name showing at the bottom of your video panel.

Finally, some proceedings may ask you to use the Raise Hand feature.

The Raise Hand feature can be used if you have a comment or question and do not want to interrupt the proceeding.

The Adjudicator or tribunals staff member may also ask you to use the ‘Raise Hand’ feature in certain situations.

To raise your hand, click Raise Hand in the control bar located at the bottom of your screen.

The adjudicator or tribunals staff member will be notified when you raise your hand and will give you time to speak at the next opportunity.

Once you have had your chance to speak, click Lower Hand.

Thanks for watching this video! Remember, testing Zoom in advance will help prepare you for your virtual proceeding.


Oct. 2022
Tribunals Ontario